33996. “After Peace Corps, I kept at it. I was back in Houston, I had a lot of spare time, and I spent it at midday yoga classes at expensive studios to which I would buy discounted first-time packages and never return. This period, around 2011, reintroduced me to the world of American abundance. The first time I went into a grocery store and saw how many different fruits there were, I cried. At these yoga classes, I marveled at the fanatic high functionality of the women around me…I was not, at the time, on their level: I had been taking giardia shits in a backyard outhouse for a year straight, and I was flooded with dread and spiritual uselessness, the sense that I had failed myself and others, the fear that I would never again be use to another human being.” ― Jia Tolentino, Trick Mirror: Reflections on Self-Delusion
33974. “For ‘The scent of yoga’ she chose Black Lapsang because its smoky opening always made her think of incense and sacred spaces- which is what she tried to create in her former dining room, but without using joss sticks because she didn’t think they went well with deep breathing. She closed her eyes as the perfume developed to reveal its Assam-tea middle note, which made her think immediately of that first yoga breakfast with Shirlee and Maxine and the yogi bears.” ― Maggie Alderson, The Scent of You
33973. “The smells I associate with yoga are contradictory. Freshly showered bodies and sweat. Sandalwood from a scented candle mixed with hot feet on rubber mats. Head-clearing pure air, ozonic freshness- and deep oriental mystery. Stillness and invigorating renewal. Feminine grace and masculine strength. Anima and animus. My scents of yoga are: Madagascan Jasmine by Grandiflora Lime Basil and Mandarin Cologne by Jo Malone London Exhale by B Never Too Busy To Be Beautiful Pour Monsieur by Chanel Oud by Maison Francis Kurkdjian New West for Her by Aramis Black Lapsang by Bodhidharma Santal by Diptyque (my favorite candle for the yoga studio)” ― Maggie Alderson, The Scent of You
33940. “This transcendent realm of Truth can be compared to the overwhelming majesty and power of a mighty rushing river. That Truth is ever-dynamic, ever-fresh, unalterable, unstoppable, and alive with spiritual power. That river of Truth has the power to quench our thirst and our longing for the nectarean sweetness of Reality unlike anything else in existence. That river of Truth is the only sustenance our soul will ever need. When directly encountered by any liberated yogi, that mighty river of Truth is experienced in its dynamic form. When this very same yogi then reveals this transcendent Truth to others in the material world, however, this dynamic Truth now becomes concretized in the form of the Vedic scriptures (shastra).” ― Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya, Sanatana Dharma: The Eternal Natural Way
33939. “The eternal flow of Truth is a non-empirically-audible sonic reality that transcends the realm of human sensory purview or intellectual speculation, but that is nonetheless directly accessible to any sincere seeker who eventually reaches the stage of being a liberated yogi. Such transcendent Truth can only be known by purifying oneself through the practices of Yoga, meditation and devotional consciousness (bhakti) toward the Supreme Godhead, and reforming one’s character to the point of dissolving illusory ego completely. It is this living, transcendent Truth that the perfected sages encounter in the yogically inspired state of non-mediated spiritual perception of the Absolute.” ― Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya, Sanatana Dharma: The Eternal Natural Way
33938. “Truth, including the very highest of spiritual and philosophical truths, can be known to us with ever-increasing depth and clarity. We can know truth, both in theory, as well as through direct experiential insight, by employing the Vedic tools of Yoga and meditation, all under the capable guidance of the Vedic scriptures, the authentic guru, and the power of our own sincerity and direct insight into the nature of the Absolute. This is the Vedic way of knowing. (p. 80)” ― Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya, Sanatana Dharma: The Eternal Natural Way
33929. “Who among us has never, at some contemplative point in our lives or another, asked the truly big questions, questions about the ultimate meaning of the world we find around us, and of our lives within it? Questioning the reason for our human existence is a very natural pursuit on the part of any intelligent human being (manushya). Indeed, unlike any other species of life, human beings alone have been gifted by God with the unique cognitive ability to engage in self-reflection upon our very own existence as human beings. To be human means to question what it means to be human.” ― Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya, Sanatana Dharma: The Eternal Natural Way
33920. “This path‘s basic technique is the discrimination between the real and the unreal, the seer and the seen, the subject and the object, the ego and the Self, and is meant to be practiced both in the seat of meditation and in daily life. The meditator should continually strive to bring his or her thought life in line with the experience of the Self garnered in meditation and elsewhere. For example, if I think there is something wrong with me, that I am unworthy or impure, for example, I need to square this idea with the experience of myself in meditation as a whole and complete being.” ― James Swartz, Meditation: Inquiry Into the Self
33919. “If action yoga suggests a change in attitude toward action, knowledge yoga requires a change in the way we think. Ordinarily, because the intellect is Self-ignorant and under ego‘s passionate influence, its concepts cause suffering. To right the inner disharmony, knowledge yoga aims to detach intellect from ego and train it to identify with and think from the Self. „Thinking from the Self“ means that impersonal truth, not personal prejudice, becomes the center of one‘s thought life, the point from which thoughts originate and to which they return. Self-ignorance manifests first as a confused and unrealistic thought life, then trickles down to disturb and delude the emotions, eventually contaminating in one‘s contact with the outer world. Because it eliminates incorrect, ignorance-born, ego-centered thoughts, reality-based knowledge produces a harmonious, clear and luminous subtle body, one suited to meditation. (p. 64)” ― James Swartz, Meditation: Inquiry Into the Self
33918. “If action yoga suggests a change in attitude toward action, knowledge yoga requires a change in the way we think. Ordinarily, because the intellect is Self-ignorant and under ego‘s passionate influence, its concepts cause suffering. To right the inner disharmony, knowledge yoga aims to detach intellect from ego and train it to identify with and think from the Self. „Thinking from the Self“ means that impersonal truth, not personal prejudice, becomes the center of one‘s thought life, the point from which thoughts originate and to which they return. Self-ignorance manifests first as a confused and unrealistic thought life, then trickles down to disturb and delude the emotions, eventually contaminating in one‘s contact with the outer world. Because it eliminates incorrect, ignorance-born, ego-centered thoughts, reality-based knowledge produces a harmonious, clear and luminous subtle body, one suited to meditation. (p. 64)” ― James Swartz, Meditation: Inquiry Into the Self
33908. “For the past ten days, I’ve had a migraine that follows me like a shadow. One hundred and forty-two hours of incessant pain, an eight on the ten-point scale. My doctor has suggested codeine, which I refused, because once I took too much Percocet after a tooth extraction and threw up for twenty-four hours straight. I have a CT scan, an MRI, I go to the neurologist—the readings are all inconclusive. I’m told it’s a migraine with an unknown cause. Have you tried yoga? they say.” ― Karla Cornejo Villavicencio, The Undocumented Americans